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Bangladesh travel advice for UK Citizen in 2022

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Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Bangladesh Travel check list with latest information on risk from COVID-19 on the TravelHealthPro website.

See the healthcare information in the Coronavirus section for information on what to do if you think you have coronavirus while in Bangladesh.

At least 8 weeks before your trip, check the latest country-specific health advice from the National Travel Health Network and Centre (NaTHNaC) on the TravelHealthPro website. Each country-specific page has information on vaccine recommendations, any current health risks or outbreaks, and factsheets with information on staying healthy abroad. Guidance is also available from NHS (Scotland) on the FitForTravel website.

General information on Bangladesh travel vaccinations and a travel health checklist is available on the NHS website. You may then wish to contact your health adviser or pharmacy for advice on other preventive measures and managing any pre-existing medical conditions while you’re abroad.

The legal status and regulation of some medicines prescribed or bought in the UK can be different in other countries. If you’re travelling with prescription or over-the-counter medicine, read this guidance from NaTHNaC on best practice when travelling with medicines. For further information on the legal status of a specific medicine, you will need to contact the embassy, high commission or consulate of the country or territory you’re travelling to.

While Bangladesh travel can be enjoyable, it can sometimes be challenging. There are clear links between mental and physical health, so looking after yourself during travel and when abroad is important. Information on travelling with mental health conditions is available in our guidance page. Further information is also available from the National Travel Health Network and Centre (NaTHNaC).

Medical facilities during Bangladesh travel can be poor. Routine tests and X-rays are unreliable. Make sure you have adequate travel health insurance and accessible funds to cover the cost of any medical treatment abroad and repatriation.

Read more: India travel advise from UK

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip and have access to a vehicle, it may be quicker to head straight to the nearest hospital yourself. If you don’t have access to a vehicle, or are unsure where the nearest hospital is situated, dial the Bangladesh National Emergency Hotline – 999 and ask for an ambulance. If you suspect a heart attack, ask for a ‘cardiac ambulance’. You should contact your insurance/medical assistance company promptly if you’re referred to a medical facility for treatment in Bangladesh travel.

Air pollution

Severe air pollution is a major hazard to public health, especially during the winter months. Dhaka is currently experiencing extremely high levels of pollution. Children, the elderly, and those with pre-existing medical conditions may be especially affected. If you’re pregnant, or have a respiratory or heart condition you may wish to consult a medical practitioner before you travel. You can find advice on air quality on the World Health Organization (WHO) website and check air quality levels in real time on the World Air Quality Index website.

Mosquito-borne diseases like dengue fever can be a concern in Bangladesh travel. There’s been a significant increase in the number of cases of dengue fever across Bangladesh, including in Dhaka. You should take steps to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes.

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